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Using Manipulatives to Encourage Literacy and Numeracy Learning for Children

13 Nov

It is no surprise that parents with primary aged children want to participate in their schooling.  Most parents I have spoken to tend to use workbooks because that is what is available, and they do have good exercises for children to practice the skills they learn at school.

The thing is, parents can be using items around the house to support their child’s literacy and numeracy development in a more meaningful way that simply using work books.  Here is my suggestion:

At Home Lesson Plan for Parents
Supplies needed:

  • a variety of items that are a solid colour (balls, toys, cups, socks, boxes, paper clips, crayons, ect.)
  • Pencil and Paper
  • Graph Paper and Crayons

*NOTE:  Only focus on one s

Steps-

Sorting:

  1. Place all of the items on a table, make sure all of the items are mixed up.
  2. Engage in a number of sorting activities:
  • Sort the items by colour
  • Sort the items by size
  • Sort the items by shape
  • Sort the items by texture
  • Sort the items by weight

Counting and Graphing:

  1. After sorting the items into a category (for example colours) ask the child to count each of the categorized items.
    Questions to ask: How many items are red? How many items are blue?  Can you tell me which colour has the most items?  Can you tell me which colour has the least items.
  2. Using the graph paper and stickers, create a simple graph using the squares to represent each of the items in the sorted categories.

Writing:

  1. Choose one of the categories and work together to create a list naming each of the sorted groups and practice writing the words on lined paper.
  • Colours:  Red, Blue, Orange, Green, Yellow, Pink, ect.
  • Shape:  Circle, Square, Triangle, Rectangle, Diamond, ect.
  • Texture: Soft, Rough, Smooth, Bumpy, Fluffy, ect.

Reading:

  1. Using a variety of texts (books, newspapers, magazines, packaging, ect) ask your child look through the texts and find the words on the list created in the writing step.
  2. When they find a word, read the sentence together and make personal connections to the context of the sentence.
    (For Example: In The Important Book by Margaret Wise Brown, one section reads,  “It is yellow in the middle, it has long white petals…”  When your child spots the word Yellow, read the sentence out loud together.  Ask your child what they think the sentence is about? Ask them to look at pictures and take a guess.  Read the sentences before to clarify and ask your child what they know or understand about, in this case, daisies, or flowers.  What other colours can a  flower be?)

Once you get into this activity you will experience a number of authentic teachable moments where you can engage your child’s curiosity and discover they’re strengths and challenges!

Try it out!  Let me know how everything went by commenting below!

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Supporting Literacy and Numeracy at Home…

27 Oct

You don’t need expensive educational toys to engage and educate children.  Making opportunities for purposeful conversation and learning through everyday tasks is more meaningful and fun!  Remember; monkey see, monkey do.

Try these activities with children to support their continuing development of reading, writing, and math skills…

  • Find objects around the house that start with any chose letter of the alphabet (Ex: “C” – couch, cat, car, chair, clock) Discuss the phonetic sounds that the chosen letter can make).
  • Find objects around the house that rhyme (Ex: Cat, Hat or Lamp, Stamp or Bed, Red)
  • Identify a few sight words (the, is, are) and have your child circle the words in the newspaper.
  • After grocery shopping, sort foods by colour, size, weight, food group.
  • Sort, count and roll coins.
  • While washing dishes, fill a cup with water and have them guess whether or not the next cup or bowl to be washed will hold the same amount of water.
  • Measure how long a piece of furniture is by counting their “feet” (toe to heel), have them guess if a table is longer or short by their “feet”. (Do the same with perimeter)
  • Cut out sticks and half circles from construction paper and ask your child to create different letters using the shapes (EX: one stick and two half circles make a “B”, or three sticks make an “H”.
  • Read with your child everyday.  Ask questions such as, “How would you feel if you were this character? Is it fair that ‘this’ is happening the character? Why or why not? What is your favourite part of the book and why?)
  • Count the days on the calendar. Ask questions like, “How many days until the end of the month?”

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23 Aug

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